The dandelion has it
matt-molloy:

134 photos merged into one image. I made this from a sunset timelapse I shot in August of 2012.

matt-molloy:

134 photos merged into one image. I made this from a sunset timelapse I shot in August of 2012.

vogue:

Chanel ImanPhotographed by Sasha Frumin, Vogue, March 2012See our summer swimsuit guide on Vogue.com

vogue:

Chanel Iman

Photographed by Sasha Frumin, Vogue, March 2012

See our summer swimsuit guide on Vogue.com

I have for the last two years, and I never want to stop. 

I have for the last two years, and I never want to stop. 

(Source: cenika, via hellogiggles)

thewomentakeover:

“The best way to encourage women not to judge other women is to encourage and create connections between them. When someone is human and vulnerable, it’s a whole lot harder to make blanket statements and judgments about her. On a larger scale, we need to stop portraying women as catty b*tches out to get each other. If girls grow up seeing complicated, deep relationships between women who are working together instead of against each other in real life and in pop culture, they’re less likely to expect those judgments from other women or to level them themselves.” - Emma Gray
Read the rest of the interview here.
Photo by Andres Bohorquez.

thewomentakeover:

“The best way to encourage women not to judge other women is to encourage and create connections between them. When someone is human and vulnerable, it’s a whole lot harder to make blanket statements and judgments about her. On a larger scale, we need to stop portraying women as catty b*tches out to get each other. If girls grow up seeing complicated, deep relationships between women who are working together instead of against each other in real life and in pop culture, they’re less likely to expect those judgments from other women or to level them themselves.” - Emma Gray

Read the rest of the interview here.

Photo by Andres Bohorquez.

(via hellogiggles)

theatlanticcities:

“At some point, I just began folding the prints, folding way the sky, folding away the sides, until I basically had an image that looked like a supermarket bar code. I somehow had the feeling this was the right way of doing it, this was the gut decision.” -Michael Wolf

Emily Badger speaks with Michael Wolf, who has been photographing Hong Kong’s apartment towers, cropping them in a way that emphasizes their geometry and density.

Read: The Strange Beauty of Density Taken to the Extreme

[Images: Michael Wolf]

(Source: thisiscitylab)

hadadietcokeforlunch:

LGBT Rights in Uganda
LGBT rights are still a huge issue in a number of countries around the world, with many people being treated as sinful and sub-human.
Whilst Uganda isn’t the only offender, their politics on the issue is particularly worrying as it seems to be becoming more conservative, rather than the situation improving. 
One of the main reasons for this homophobia, it is speculated, is Christianity in the region and attitudes established by colonialism, as well as inevitable fear of the ‘other’. However, no matter your religious belief, even if you believe homosexuality is a sin, the lack of compassion showed towards such individuals is appalling. 
I could talk about this all day and further discuss the hypocrisy of Christianity for singling out this one issue above, for example, adultery, but I’ll leave that for another time. 
There is some hope for Uganda as a number of LGBT Rights groups remain prevalent, despite violent backlash and the risk of arrest. The extremity of the way homosexuals are treated in Uganda has also brought light to the issue for those in the West and led to external campaigning. 
For more information:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/04/gay-people-uganda-love-run
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=168gaNmaIFo

hadadietcokeforlunch:

LGBT Rights in Uganda

LGBT rights are still a huge issue in a number of countries around the world, with many people being treated as sinful and sub-human.

Whilst Uganda isn’t the only offender, their politics on the issue is particularly worrying as it seems to be becoming more conservative, rather than the situation improving. 

One of the main reasons for this homophobia, it is speculated, is Christianity in the region and attitudes established by colonialism, as well as inevitable fear of the ‘other’. However, no matter your religious belief, even if you believe homosexuality is a sin, the lack of compassion showed towards such individuals is appalling. 

I could talk about this all day and further discuss the hypocrisy of Christianity for singling out this one issue above, for example, adultery, but I’ll leave that for another time. 

There is some hope for Uganda as a number of LGBT Rights groups remain prevalent, despite violent backlash and the risk of arrest. The extremity of the way homosexuals are treated in Uganda has also brought light to the issue for those in the West and led to external campaigning. 

For more information:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/04/gay-people-uganda-love-run

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=168gaNmaIFo

theme